Treva Wallace – My MS Story

There are currently 245 members of Ebony Caper’s “Women Of Color With Multiple Sclerosis” facebook group, and Treva Wallace Miller is one of them. She’s very unique.  She’s a risk taker.  She’s someone I want you all to know and support.

I met Treva online in the group on a more personal level when she inquired about the #45DayRawFoodDietChallenge.  As I got to know her, I discovered the entrepreneurial side of her (see ending link), her family side, and of course her side of multiple sclerosis.  Getting to know Treva has been an honor, and it’s my hope that others will learn of her story and join her support team.  Thanks Treva Wallace Miller for opening up to our readers and sharing your MS story.

Statistics show that “The average person in the United States has about one in 750 (.1%) chance of developing MS”. Research has demonstrated that MS occurs in most ethnic groups, including African-Americans, Asians and Hispanics/Latinos, but is most common amongst Caucasians. Susceptibility rates vary among these groups, with recent findings suggesting that African American women have a higher than previously reported risk of developing MS.  There are limited resources when it comes to Multiple Sclerosis and still not enough awareness.  In my search for “other’s like me”, I ran across Mrs. Treva Miller Wallace.  She brightens my day every time I speak with her, as we are sisters of the WOMEN OF COLOR WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS facebook group. It’s good to be among family, especially those who can relate to your own struggles

Here’s the story of one of those very unique people, Treva Wallace.

 

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TREVA WALLACE MILLER – MS STORY

It all started in 1995 on September 13, 2005 (1 DAY BEFORE MY

35TH BIRTHDAY) I got the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Leading in

to the diagnosis, I was concerned about several things that were going

on with my body.

 

These were: Severe fatigue, when walking, my left foot would not pick

up and I would stub my left toe all the time. I would stumble/trip going

up the stairs. I also notice that when walking my feet would go numb.

At work, I began to walk as if I was drunk…people used to look at me

crazy. Fast forward about six months later, I was sent to a neurologist

who did a series of neurological tests. All were normal! About 3

months later I woke up one morning and noticed my whole left side felt

numb.  Doctor decided it was time for a last straw test, a spinal tap!

Well within two days later, I got the diagnosis.  In 1997 I had to leave

my job due to severe fatigue.

 

Overtime my lower extremities began to diminish and my feet are now

numb and tingly. It began to affect my driving. I could feel the petal

sometimes and sometime I could not. One day I was driving to do

some Christmas shopping and my foot slipped and went behind the

pedal. It scared me because I had a hard time putting it back on the

pedal.  This was very dangerous. And I pulled over and called my son

to come and get me. I haven’t driven since. That was two years ago.

This has affected my ability of being able to go at my leisure. I am

relying on family, friends and public transportation. Sometimes it may

be a week before I get out of the house. When using public

transportation, if I have multiple errands, I will have up to an hour wait

before I can be picked up again.   Not being able to drive has really

impacted my ability to being mobile.

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My community involvement included working with the Jr. Miss Tri-

Cities Pageant and AAAS (A scholarship program for African-

American youth who are honored if they achieved a 3.0 or higher).  I

also served as Youth Leader, Choir Director, Church Secretary and

Stewardess at my church.

 

I really want to get back into the community scene. My hopes are to

get a wheelchair accessible van with a side ramp and hand controls.

I look forward to getting back into the community.

 

Follow Treva Wallace Miller at

2 comments

  1. I too have MS, and I’m an author, Thylias Moss, a woman of color, lots of them, and I belong to the Facebook group, “Women f Color with MS; totally symptom free since 2013!

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